Answers to FAQs for USA J-1/J-2 Visa Insurance

A J-1 visa is a stamp in a person's passport, required (except in the case of Canadians) for people who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents to enter the United States. The J-1 visa is intended for, among others, scholars who want to come to the US temporarily to teach in a college or university, do research, or both.
The Department of State has established the following requirements for the type and amounts of coverage required to maintain J-1 or J-2 status:
  1. J1 Scholar (Exchange Visitor Visa) Medical Insurance policy must provide "medical benefits of at least $50,000 for each accident or illness." It means that an acceptable policy couldn't set a maximum lower than $50,000 in benefits for each accident or illness. However, starting May 15, 2015 this maximum will be increased to $100,000. Students with existing policies should be able to upgrade their policies this one time by paying the increased rate.
  2. If a J visa holder dies in the U.S., then the policy must provide at least $25,000 in repatriation benefits to send the remains to the home country for burial.
  3. The deductible should not exceed $500 per accident or illness.
  4. The co-payment of medical expenses (the portion not covered by insurance that the insured pays him or herself) should be of no more than 25%.
  5. If, because of a serious illness or injury, you must be sent home on the advice of a doctor, the policy must pay up to $50,000 for the expenses of your travel.
  6. J1 Scholar (Exchange Visitor Visa) Medical Insurance policy may establish a waiting period before it covers pre-existing conditions (that is, health problems you had before you bought the insurance), as long as the waiting period is reasonable by current standards in the insurance business.
  7. If you elect to satisfy the insurance requirement through a policy issued in your home country, the policy must be backed by the full faith and credit of your government. Otherwise, the company providing the insurance must meet minimum rating requirements established by Department of State (an A.M. Best rating of "A-" or better, an Insurance Solvency International, Ltd. (ISI) rating of "A-1" or better, a Standard & Poor's Claims-Paying Ability rating of "A-" or better, or a Weiss Research, Inc. rating of "B+" or better).
These requirements apply to both J-1 students and scholars and to their J-2 dependent spouses and children.
To underscore the seriousness with which the Department of State views health insurance, the new regulations require your J program sponsor to terminate your status in the U.S. if you willfully fail to comply with the insurance requirement.
A visiting foreign scholar is a person who comes to the university temporarily, mainly to teach, do research, or both. The broad term "visiting foreign scholar" encompasses, for example, Fulbright scholars who come to teach, post doctoral research fellows, and visiting professors. Some foreign scholars are at the university for only a few days; others remain for three years. Visiting foreign scholars come to the University for academic enterprises, not for non-academic employment. Visiting foreign scholars normally hold a visa known as a J-1 or exchange-visitor visa. Some people who acquire J-1 status are subject to what is known as the two-year, home-country physical presence requirement. Dependents (spouses and children below the age of 21 of J1 visa holder) are in a status called J-2.
The prospective scholar must then obtain a "visa" from the United States embassy or a United States consulate in his or her own country. (Citizens and permanent residents of Canada need neither a passport nor a visa to enter the United States.) To obtain a J-1 visa from an American embassy or consular post abroad, the prospective scholar must have a Form DS-2019 from the American institute inviting the scholar.
Yes. You have access to a website that will have all of your information which you can update address and renew your policy, check effective/end dates, etc. We can also help you with this via email or phone.
As long as you purchase the first time for at least three months, you will be able to renew or extend the policy up to 12 months from the start date and then renew for up to five years

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